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Addyman

E.T.W. Addyman


History

Erik Thomas Waterhouse Addyman, born in Starbeck, Harrogate, Yorkshire in 1890, the son of James and Edith Addyman, was another of those larger than life characters that seemed to be part of early British aviation. His father, a solicitor, was Norwegian Vice-Consul (hence Erik not Eric). He trained as an engineer at Kitson's College in Leeds. During the First World War he initially worked at the Portsmouth School of Mines researching depth charges and later he moved to Dumphries, to the Arrol Johnson Engineering Works, during which time he was awarded several patents associated with improvements to the internal combustion engine.

In July 1920, Erik married Evelyn Mary Fisher, having three sons, James Cadwallader, Oscar Thomas and Peter Vincent. Later in the 1920s he moved back to Starbeck and used his engineering background to build at least five motor cars. He also was a keen pot-holer and climber and was a reserve in the Mallory-Irvine Everest attempt in 1924.

In January, 1930, The Harrogate Aircraft Club was formed with Addyman as the Hon. Secretary. Their first construction was a Dickson Primary built by and for the use of members and it was in this machine that Addyman suffered a serious accident on February 14th, 1932, breaking both legs and requiring the lower part of his right arm to be amputated.

Despite this handicap, Addyman was soon to design his own gliders, the Zephyr sailplane in 1933 followed by the Standard Training Glider in 1934. He also intended to fit an Anzani to an S.T.G. type but although work was begun in 1936, it was not completed.

Erik Waterhouse died in Harrogate, Yorkshire, on 24 January 1963

Company References
  1. The Yorkshire Post, Aug 19, 1989
  2. http://www.yorkshire-aircraft.co.uk/aircraft/planes/preww2/glidwhit.html



Project Data 

Project No

Type No

Name

Alternative Name(s)

Year

Spec

Status

Qty

Description

References

   Zephyr  1933  Proto 1 1S glider 1,3
   S.T.G. Standard Training Glider 1934  Prdn 2 1S glider 1
   Ultra-light  1936  Pro(n) 1 1S ultralight 1,2

Project References
  1. British Gliders and Sailplanes 1922-1970, Norman Ellison (Adam and Charles Black, 1970)
  2. British Homebuilt Aircraft Since 1920, Ken Ellis (Mersyside Aviation Society, 1975)
  3. Sailplane & Glider Magazine, Vol.4, No.8



Production Data

 Zephyr :One machine only; was to have joined the Northern Aircraft Preservation Society as BAPC.59, but destroyed before delivery.
 S.T.G. :Two built; both survive as BAPC.14 and BAPC.15.
 Ultra-light :One aircraft, developed from the S.T.G; survives as BAPC.16.

   Total Addyman Production     4   

Production References
  1. British Gliders and Sailplanes 1922-1970, Norman Ellison (Adam and Charles Black, 1970)
  2. British Homebuilt Aircraft Since 1920, Ken Ellis (Mersyside Aviation Society, 1975)

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V1.3.0 Created by Roger Moss. Last updated February 2017